Transactional Analysis

Transactional Analysis (TA) is a psychotherapeutic approach to healing and understanding how human beings work and relate to one another. It looks at how the past might be influencing the present and causing all sorts of difficulties. It was developed by Eric Berne in the 1950s and 1960s and has been evolving ever since.
Eric Berne developed the concept of Ego States which is a fundamental theory of TA. It explains the complex voices and feelings that we all hear and act out.
The Parent Ego State represents the beliefs that we have inherited from our families and our culture. The behaviours, thoughts and feelings that have been introjected from parents and figures

The Adult Ego State is the behaviours, thoughts and feelings that are in direct response to the here and now and this Ego State is fluid, full of energy and growth.
The Child Ego State represents how we have reacted to these beliefs and the situations we have been through such as traumatic experiences, unmet needs and how we have adapted.

TA looks at how unconscious negative beliefs about yourself developed in childhood and how they are impacting your life and relationships today. As children, we had to learn behaviours to cope with situations that perhaps we partly understood and perhaps not at all. Today as Adults these behaviours may be really preventing us from living fully. It’s important to look at all these confusing feelings and give them time to reorganise and express themselves.
We all have a story that makes sense to our experiences but the problem is when we get stuck in parts of the story and repeat over and over behaviours that keep us feeling sad, alone, afraid or angry. TA psychotherapy explores how our story and the way we communicate with others is based on our relationship with ourselves and the past.

How does TA work?

  • By listening to our stories and challenging maladaptive decisions that have been made that have blocked our awareness, intimacy and spontaneity
  • By inviting healthy contact through the therapeutic relationship
  • By challenging discounts and offering new frames of reference to empower people to think for themselves
  • By making contact with the wounded inner Child
  • By challenging abusive internal inner voices and
  • By encouraging the integration of new ways of thinking and feeling